College Scholarship Pointers

Diane

Ok, so you might be applying for colleges, you may have made a decision, or you may even have already started school.  It’s never too late to start thinking about scholarships to help defray some of the costs associated with college tuition.

First, let me give you a brief definition of the types of scholarships available:

Career:  Scholarships that are specifically for students that would like to take a particular career path.

College:  Individual colleges will often have their own scholarship programs. Selection is often based on academic merit and financial need.

Merit: These scholarships are based on your academic, athletic, artistic/performance, or involvement in community service.

Need: These scholarships are granted based on you or your family’s financial situation.

Student: This category will award scholarships based on factors such as race, ethnicity, medical history, gender, and other criteria.    scholarship-pointers

Applying and receiving a scholarship can help bridge the gap between the cost of tuition, financial aid packages (if applicable), and what you will have to pay out of pocket.  Never assume that you have missed the deadline to apply for a scholarship.  The majority of deadlines occur in the first quarter of the year, but many programs have varying time frames.  Also, some school or career scholarships might be available only to students after completing a few semesters of college-level work.

Apply for as many scholarships as you think you may qualify.  The process can be time-consuming and require individual essays, but in some cases, the work can pay off.  Don’t assume that you must be a straight A student or a minority to be eligible. This is not the case.  Many scholarships are available to a student with a special talent or unique interest.  Here is a list of 100+ Scholarships for you to explore.  Watch the deadlines, and read all the details for eligibility.

Here is another tip or warning:  If the scholarship asks for an application fee or resource requires payment to look for scholarships, it is likely a scam.

If you are interested in free reputable sites to begin your scholarship search, try: Petersons.com, Unigo.com, collegeboard.org, niche.com, collegenet.com, ScholarshipExperts.com

Finally, I will suggest you look at your parent’s employer.  Beyond scholarships, there might be workplace benefits that can lower the cost of computers, insurance, and travel.  All these little things add up to the overall cost of an education.  If you can get reduced insurance rates for good grades or get a discount on computers, why not take advantage of it.  Every little bit helps in the end.  Good luck.

 

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